Posts tagged: miles davis

Music Interview Podcasts

By , August 31, 2018 10:54 am

Gilles Peterson (middle) with Stretch and Bobbito

 

I’ve been doing a bit more driving lately with my private teaching, so I’ve started to get back into some podcasts, specifically music related ones.

I have heard some interviews in the last couple of months that I found completely fascinating!  I thought they would be worth sharing here in case any of you all would be interested.  The Gilles Peterson interviews are older, but luckily they are still available on Soundcloud.

Gilles Peterson interviews Jon Hassell:  https://soundcloud.com/gillespeterson/jon-hassell-words-music

  • I only knew Hassell by name before listening here.  Informative stories about working with David Byrne and Brian Eno, his formulation of the “Fourth World” concept, and how he views integrating and fusing different musical styles and traditions.

Lenny Kravitz with Stretch and Bobbito:  https://www.npr.org/2018/08/20/640288231/lenny-kravitz-on-race-raise-vibration-and-duetting-with-aretha-franklin

  • Kravitz talked about his childhood experiences with some of the greatest jazz and soul musicians, adjusting to growing up in LA vs. growing up in New York, how he was marketed by the music industry in the late 80’s and early 90’s, and much more.  

Gilles Peterson interviews Goldie:  https://soundcloud.com/gillespeterson/goldie-interview

  • I was not familiar with Goldie at all before this interview, so needless to say I learned a lot!  Goldie covers significant musical ground, talking about the Stranglers, UB40, Supertramp, Pat Metheny and Lyle Mays, Art Blakey, and Teena Marie,  as well as soooooo much music from his peers in Drum and Bass music.

Gilles Peterson interviews Chaka Khan:  https://soundcloud.com/mistral-productions/gilles-peterson-with-chaka-khan

  • Some of the topics:  Chicago funk, Charles Stepney, and Rotary Connection, leaving as a teenager for LA with Rufus, working with Rufus in general, collaborating with Miles Davis, how Stevie Wonder ended up writing “Tell Me Something Good”, her preferences for horns and horn sections, and a lot more!

 

 

 

 

Library Music Finds

By , December 31, 2015 5:05 pm

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I’m going through another heavy library-listening phase, checking out CDs by the armful!  Here are some things I’ve been checking  out:

Grant Green, Idle Moments – The more I listen to Grant Green, the more I like his playing, specifically the thematic way in which he improvises.  Although it is sometimes repetitive, I think that repetition is really intentional and makes his solos more melodic, and his language is strong.  This record also has Bobby Hutcherson and Joe Henderson on it too, so there is an interesting meeting of approaches.

Billy Childs, Map to the Treasure:  Reimagining Laura Nyro – I had never listened to Nyro’s music before, so I don’t know how different Childs made these songs with the arrangements, but the arrangements are really moving and well done.  This album has has Becca Stevens on a few tracks, which led me to her album Perfect Animal, another cool record with unique sounds and really great vocal work from her.

Miles Davis Quintet, Live in Europe 1969 – I have to be ready for some pretty intense free/noise improvisation to listen to this era of Miles, but, as I like to say sometimes, the music and the band is undeniable.  Chick Corea, Jack Dejohnette, Miles, Wayne Shorter, and Dave Holland; this is the band before the Bitches Brew bands but after In a Silent Way, so you can kind of hear a transition happening.  It also came with a concert DVD, so it was fun to get a chance to actually watch these guys play.

Roland Kirk, We Free Kings – I think Kirk is pretty underrated, or at least pigeon-holed for playing multiple woodwinds at once, which is really cool and sounds great, but he also was really inventive and unique on singular horns too, working in and building on the bebop language, and I think he was very creative in terms of fusing bebop, blues, and free jazz together.

Rudresh Mahanthappa, Bird Calls – Also very intense music, but for me this record was inspiring in how unique Mahanthappa’s approach is to alto saxophone; you can hear the influences and the individuality together, and it’s clear he’s worked on his approach in a clear way.

Sergio Mendes, Herp Alpert Presents Sergio Mendes and Brasil ’66 – This was a pleasant surprise for me; I had just recently watched the documentary The Wrecking Crew, which talks a little bit about Alpert’s work in the ’60’s and 70’s, and when I saw this album I had to check it out, not just for Alpert’s name but also because I had Medes’ name as well but never listened.  Super strong mood and vibe throughout, with funky beats and cool tunes!

Anyway, that’s just a taste, I’m still going through a lot of things that I just found by sifting through the jazz sections of the cds at Seattle Public Libraries, and I can’t recommend it enough.  Even if jazz isn’t your thing, there are albums to be found in the other sections as well.

-Art

 

 

 

 

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